Faux Tolerance & What It Means for You

It’s time for everyone to get out their copy of 1984 and read it. That CEO Brendan Eich treated everyone at Mozilla equally and still was forced out in the name of tolerance because he gave $1000 to a Prop 8 Campaign six years ago is official Newspeak, where a thoughtcrime is defined as the “act of holding unspoken beliefs or doubts that oppose or question the ruling party.” The fact that at that time Eich simply agreed with Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton who said “Marriage has a historic, religious and moral context that goes back to the beginning of time. And I think a marriage has always been between a man and a woman”,  is simply material for the memory hole. Clinton only came out last year in favor of homo marriage with no apologies for her past crimes against human rights.

It’s not accurate to identify the ruling party as homosexuals because they aren’t ruling and they are only 2-3% of the population. The president of the old homosexual movement was Andrew Sullivan who said the firing of Eich disgusts him as it should anyone who wants a tolerant and diverse society. Sullivan is what used to be known as a liberal, that is, someone who can actually stomach the views of those who disagree with them without calling for their careers and heads. He also continues to admirably stand against the defenders of Gaystapo coercion. 

Some will think that this heresy hunting is limited to the upper echelons, CEOs and lawmakers and such, but it’s not. People in the grip of this myopia are willing to go after florists and photographers, and most recently a local grocer in Sellwood, OR–what were they thinking trying to move into an “open-minded” neighborhood with all that dissent and diverse thought? Irony is lost on these people.

Mainstream news networks didn’t mention the Eich story last week, and this tell us the shaming of faux tolerance is working. Cowards fear shame and will ignore injustice, shouting down voices who stand for it, even when the voice in Andrew Sullivan’s. Anyone who believes in freedom of speech, much less freedom of religion, has no option but speak up when they have opportunity. They must speak first to their own children and not refrain due to the idea that “this is just politics.” No, this is the freedom for your neighbor to own or work at a grocery store while holding the opinion that sodomy isn’t a good idea. This is the smallest example of live and let live. So first, you must speak . Second, you should know what’s coming when you do, when you profess to agree with Hillary in early 2013. You’ll be labeled by Newspeak with all of your hate speech and unevolved opinion. But that’s okay. The opinions of those quashing diversity in the name of it are hilarious and need to be laughed at and pitied, but not taken seriously as every insecure bully demands.

 

He is easy to please

“Every human activity, except sin, can be done for God’s pleasure if you do it with an attitude of praise. You can wash dishes, repair a machine, sell a product, write a computer program, grow a crop, and raise a family for the glory of God.” –Rick Warren

The Called Out

As the church we must always remember that we are God’s summoned people. We are the ekklesia, the called out ones, drawn to the Father through the Son by the Spirit in relationship. As one big family we are brought together each week on the Lord’s Day to be renewed and blessed.

What we do in gathered worship is not like the Kiwanas or any voluntary association where we decided to have a meeting and therefore could decide to cancel it or not show up because we found something better to do. This doesn’t mean God calls us to meet with him against our will; if we are loving him, this becomes refreshing and our greatest joy. This is a weekly day of rest, rejoicing, fellowship, and covenant renewal with our creator and redeemer.

But we want to be disciples in worship, and remember that everything we do here is about God, and not us. We’re not the customer, nor are the unchurched. Everyone is welcomed and in fact also called by God to taste and see that he gracious—but God is the customer. He is the one we are trying to please.    Continue reading

Enflesh the Bones

“The true way to get rid of the boniness of your sermon is not by leaving out the skeleton but by clothing it with flesh. True liberty in writing comes by law, and the more thoroughly the outlines of your work are laid out, the more freely your sermon will flow, like an unwasted stream between its well-built banks.” -Phillips Brooks

 

Keeping the Fast

Happy, or, maybe sad, Ash Wednesday! Here is a good article over at Mere Orthodoxy on why you should keep eating sausages during Lent. Maybe you should buy an extra sausage since they’re always better with a friend. And here’s another article over there consisting mainly of quotes from wise people who reject common pitfalls that come with observing Lent.

I have no doubt that Lent can be observed wisely and helpfully by the kind of people who recognize the wisdom and cautions in the above articles. Jesus went to Jerusalem to conquer death, so this is cause for celebration and a wonderful reminder to take up our crosses. This is why Lent provokes discussion, because it makes us ask the question: What does it mean to take up our crosses? That is a huge question, but here I only want to briefly address the topic of fasting which is central to the way Lent is typically observed. Continue reading

The Giver Behind the Gifts

There is nothing we have that isn’t a gift, but God’s greatest gift is the one that enables us to see this truth—the giver behind the gifts. G.K. Chesterton got at this when he said, “We thank people for birthday presents of cigars and slippers. Can I thank no one for the birthday present of birth?”

All day long we stand beneath a cascading waterfall of God’s grace, his unmerited gifts to us: life, health, friends and family, food and sunshine and rain and the pleasures we meet in immeasurable ways. Our duty is to receive all of these and then look at the source, the spring that it all flows from, and simply say thank you.

The prophet Jeremiah says the human heart is the epitome of deceit and desperately wicked–“who can know it?”, he asks rhetorically. And so we take the most obvious gifts and obscure their source. Jesus confronted the people that did this with the Bible in his day in John 5:39: “You search the Scriptures because you think that in them you have eternal life; and it is they that bear witness about me.” Instead of meeting God through the book, they bowed down and worshipped the book. It’s like being given a fork to eat with but deciding instead to stick it in your eye.

God gives the us Bible, the liturgy, the Lord’s Supper, the sermon, forgiveness, one another, all of these things, so that we would enjoys the gifts and through them see and thank the Giver.